Image: Representation of developing a business idea. Business table with office objects and colorful puzzle.

Image: Representation of developing a business idea. Business table with office objects and colorful puzzle.


CHRIL Fellowship Program

Currently Seeking Candidates for the CHRIL Postdoctoral Research Associate Position

The Collaborative on Health Reform and Independent Living is pleased to announce an opening in our postdoctoral research training program in disability policy. We are seeking qualified candidates who are committed to a career producing and using high-quality research about people with disabilities to influence policies, opportunities, and outcomes for this community.

The primary goal of this fellowship is to provide a highly personalized 18-month research training experience to scholars with disabilities who hold doctorates or similar advanced degrees and are personally committed to understanding and improving health policies and services for all Americans with disabilities. The fellowship involves rigorous coursework and progressively more independent research activities. All fellows will be eligible for extensive accommodations and ongoing support by advisors who have both personal and professional experience with disability.

The fellowship will complement and extend the work of the Collaborative on Health Reform and Independent Living (CHRIL), a multisite Disability and Rehabilitation Research Project funded by the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living and Rehabilitation Research. The main fellowship site is Washington State University’s health sciences campus in Spokane Washington; during the last part of their training period, fellows may choose to spend 3-6 months at one or more CHRIL affiliate sites, including Washington, D.C. (American Association on Health and Disability), Lawrence, KS (Institute for Health and Disability Policy Studies), or Houston, TX (Independent Living Research Utilization). CHRIL research and outreach projects include assessments of health insurance outcomes for consumers with disabilities, the training needs of Centers for Independent Living, trends in insurance coverage, access, and cost, and the impact of health reform on workplace participation and/or benefit enrollment. More information on the CHRIL’s research and training activities can be found at the Collaborative on Health Reform and Independent Living website.


Reprinted from WSU Insider. Written by Addy Hatch, College of Nursing. 

Research scientists with disabilities are underrepresented in the health sciences, yet such scholars bring needed perspective to understanding and improving health policies and services for people with disabilities.

A new federal grant will help WSU hire three post-doctoral students with disabilities to become academic researchers, with the goal of having them go on to faculty positions at major universities or leadership roles in federal research agencies and nonprofit foundations.

The five-year, $750,000 award from the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research will provide a competitive salary, full benefits and support for any needed workplace assistance or adaptive technologies.

Called the Collaborative on Health Reform and Independent Living Fellowship (CHRIL-F), the positions “will bring new scholars with disabilities to the table, and provide them the skills and support they will need to enlarge the policy debate,” said Jae Kennedy, principal investigator and chair of the WSU Department of Health Policy and Administration.

The three fellows will be hired by WSU in staggered terms over the five-year grant, and will spend 18 months taking graduate courses, working on research grant proposals and journal manuscripts, and developing individual plans of research. They can spend three to six months of the fellowship at one or more affiliate sites, including Washington, D.C.; Houston, Texas; or Lawrence, Kan.

Grant funding also can be used for conference travel, which typically is more difficult and costly for people with disabilities, but which is critical for networking and presenting research work. The specific uses of support funds will depend on the needs of the fellows hired, but could include office space reconfiguration, or hiring a personal aide or interpreter.

With this grant, “We propose building a small but sturdy pipeline for disability researchers with disabilities by designing postdoc positions specific to their needs,” Kennedy said.

Besides Kennedy, the project team includes Roberta Carlin, director of the American Association on Health and Disability; Lex Frieden, a professor of bioinformatics and rehabilitation at the University of Texas in Houston; Jean Hall, a professor and director of the Institute for Health and Disability Policy at the University of Kansas; and Elizabeth Wood, a research associate in the Department of Health Policy and Administration at WSU.

The same team makes up the Collaborative on Health Reform and Independent Living (CHRIL), established by Kennedy under a $2.5 million federal grant to bring together disability advocates and researchers to investigate how the Affordable Care Act and related legislation affects the lives of adults with disabilities.

“The members of the CHRIL have personal, professional and political experience with disability, and many contacts throughout the research and disability communities,” Kennedy said. “We are not just advocates and researchers who happen to have disabilities: disability is central to what we do and why we do it.”